Weird

Elusive Fish Believed To Be A Predictor of Major Catastrophes

Animals being able to sense coming disasters is pretty much a well-known fact.  Such as when your family pet perks its ears up when it senses and knows something just isn’t right.

But can those animals that live in the ocean have this same sense of impending doom?  Scientists seem to believe so.

The island of Mindanao in the Philippines was hit with a massively devastating 6.5 magnitude earthquake in 2017.  Homes and businesses were lost, and there was a tremendous amount of damage to sift through.

Just as disturbing was what was found on the beaches following the earthquake.  Bodies of a large creature that resides in the deepest areas of the ocean had appeared to wash up on shore.  But why?

Image: Animal Crossing: New Leaf Wiki

What is curious is that these same elusive fish bodies were discovered to have washed up on shore right before the earthquakes and tsunamis that hight Japan, Chile, and Haiti.  Was this just a coincidence, or were these creatures harbingers of the massive disasters to come?

What makes the fact they were found on the beaches all the more interesting is that they are known to live in the deepest parts of the ocean and are almost never seen by humans.

The creature is known as an oarfish.

Believed to be the source of sea serpents of legend, they are known in Japan as “messengers from the sea god’s palace.” The Pacific island of Palau refers to the creatures as “roosterfish” due to the spiny red fins along the top of their heads.

Image: Biodiversity Heritage Library

The oarfish sightings are not exclusive to Asia, as California has been known to have oarfish sightings.  With California also being prone to earthquakes, could that be why the oarfish are drawn there?  Are they really able to predict such natural disasters?

Scientists are not positive as of yet, but the evidence does seem to be piling up that there is a good possibility that oarfish sense the coming events, and for some reason head for the beach shores.